Introducing The .strandberg* Varberg

If you haven’t got your paws on a .strandberg* guitar with an EndurNeck™ before it’s a strange experience simply because contrary to what your eyes may tell you, it doesn’t feel strange.

Feed Your Frankenstein: Ten Halloween Sounds You Can Make With Your Guitar

Have you ever wondered how they make all of those cool sound effects in your favorite thrillers? On those backlot tours I learned that there are entire crews of people dedicated to that very purpose for every horror film that is made. The cool part? You can use your guitar to make some of the very same sounds you’re used to hearing during your favorite horror movies.

Review: Alternative 8/Screaming Demon Set

For a while I’ve been looking for the perfect allround set to go in either a Les Paul or Super strat and I believe I stumbled on the set that ticks all the boxes for me. I wanted a bridge pickup that was hot but not overly so. Great harmonics, singing leads with enough edge to cut through the mix without sounding too thin or thick. I want my rhythm parts to be chunky and crunchy but when I roll back the volume I want clarity.

Using Amps And Pedals Together

When I was younger, I absolutely refused to play with pedals: stompboxes, distortions, overdrives, boosters: anything that would make your amp go to ’11.’ I simply didn’t want to understand why you should or would use them. “I always chose my amps based on their ability to crunch and the voice of the overdrive, so why bother,” I thought. “Wanna have more distortion? Crank up the gain pot of your amp. Not enough gain? Wrong amp!” It was that simple for me. My turn-around point came somewhere last year. I saw more players use the backline of a venue or the house PA with a bunch of pedals in front of them, and sometimes with a tiny 15 watt tube amp with a nice clean sound. I couldn’t see why that approach had benefits until I borrowed a few pedals to see how that worked. So, let’s take a look at how stompboxes worked for me.

Cage Match: 6 Vs. 7/8 Strings

These days we see a bunch of 7 and 8 string guitars next to the Ol’ Faithful 6 string on the shop walls. What is with these crazy things, anyway? Why do we need one or two more strings? Are those extra strings really gonna be used? This article will unravel this battle, which seems…

The Seymour Duncan Dirty Deed Distortion Pedal

There are all kinds of distortion pedals out there, and I’ve tried lots of them. The Seymour Duncan Dirty Deed isn’t like any of them. This article will let you know what makes this pedal different, with sound clips of its most popular settings as well as providing one with a full band so you…

Introducing The Dirty Deed Distortion Pedal

The Dirty Deed is the result of several years of engineering and testing to create a pedal that could provide a natural organic sounding distortion and have tons of versatility. Whether you are playing your favorite classic rock songs or needing some neighborhood shattering distortion the Dirty Deed can get you there. With highly responsive…

My Recipe For A Great Hybrid Pickup

A couple of years ago the hybrid pickup made its debut on the Seymour Duncan User Group Forum as a home-brewed pickup. The idea was simple: take one coil of the ‘59 (the acclaimed PAF-type pickup), take one coil of the Custom, the popular hotrodded PAF-style pickup, pair them together and voila: an amazing pickup was…

Seymour Duncan’s Prodigal Sons: the SH-7 and the SH-9

If you were to take a close look at the lineup of pickups from Seymour Duncan, you might notice a numbering system for the humbuckers: SH-1 (’59), SH-2 (Jazz), SH-3 (Stag Mag), all the way up to SH-18. This nice line of sequential pickups gives you an indication how old a specific design is. For example, it’s pretty commonly known that the SH-2 Jazz and SH-4 JB were developed simultaneously. It doesn’t take much imagination to think that those first few pickups were designed and released in the same era, the late 1970s. But look again and you might notice two gaping holes in the lineup. The SH-7 and SH-9 are missing!

Don’t Tickle Your Guitar: Playing Like You Mean It!

Back in the mid-1990s, when I was a young teenager just starting to learn to play the electric guitar, I read an interview with Angus Young in an issue of Guitar World that has stuck with me to this day. The gist of the interview could be summed up in one elegant quote. On the subject of growing up with and learning to play guitar himself, Angus recalled this gem from his brother (and brilliantly understated co-guitarist) Malcolm: “Don’t tickle it, hit the bugger!”

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