The Most Misheard Lyrics In Rock History

Once upon a time, in my first job upon landing in Los Angeles, a co-worker once randomly asked “Do you like the Cult?” “Sure!” I replied, having seen them on the Sonic Temple tour not long before relocating. “My favorite song of theirs is ‘Party Woman’!” he exclaimed. “What?” I was momentarily confused. “What are…

Introducing The Jimi Hendrix™ Signature Strat Set

On March 28, 1968, a young Seymour W. Duncan presented Jimi with a gift: a bag of early 60’s Stratocaster pickups that he rewound with his already considerable knowledge on how to get the most out of a guitar. The Jimi Hendrix Experience were booked to play two shows at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio…

In Guitar, Context is Everything

What was such a big deal about the Beatles? Didn’t Les Paul play music my grandmother described as ‘old’? Isn’t Jimi Hendrix famous for playing ‘Silent Night’ at some festival in the 40’s or something? In music and guitar history, context means something.

Cage Match: Learning Right-Handed or Left-Handed

It all starts somewhere. The first trip to the music store is either with the parents, or as an adult because ‘you always wanted to play.’ Most players fit into the above categories, and usually the first thing the salesperson asks is if you are left- or right-handed. They don’t ask new flute players this, and they don’t ask new piano students. They don’t even ask drummers. New guitarists and bassists are supposed to know what feels more ‘natural’ when everything, from holding a guitar or bass, to pressing on those tiny strings feels so unnatural.

You’re Never Too Old To Learn

Throughout my performing and teaching life, I’ve had lots of older people coming up to me and telling me that they’ve always wanted to play guitar. This is followed by the usual excuse of wishing they’d started when they were young, or even the very morbid “I don’t have much time left, and it takes years to become a pro.” Well, yeah it does, but learning something like guitar does not always have to be something you start very young. In fact, there is nothing about guitar that specifically states you have to be young to do it. It is true, then, that you are never too old to learn…

Reader’s Choice: Cover Tunes That Are Better Than The Originals

The true test of covering someone elses’ song is making it your own. That’s no easy feat, and while there’s a tonne of cover versions of classic and contemporary tunes, only a few stand the test of time. Even more rare are the ones that eclipse the original. Recently we asked Seymour Duncan readers what their…

Top 5 Reasons Why I Love Strats

The Fender Stratocaster is a pretty unique instrument. I mean, just think: when it came out, natural finishes were all the rage, and other than its cousin the Telecaster, electric guitars contained their acoustic roots in the shapes, colors, and sounds. But the Strat changed everything. Leo Fender heard the music of the 1950s changing. He tapped into the Southern California hot rod culture for his color palette and refined his ‘easy to assemble with a versatile sound’ design in the Strat. While they were still available in natural and sunburst, he later added those colors we now call ’50s colors’ like Shoreline Gold, Seafoam Green, Shell Pink, and Daphne Blue. It is hard to imagine what they must have looked like on the walls of a late 1950s music store. With all the custom finishes available today, we have to give our thanks where it all began. This article is about the top five things I love about a Strat. Now, I’m using a pretty broad brush here, and including Strat-a-likes (I have a Warmoth, as well as an ’82 ‘The Strat’), as well as some shredsticks too, which wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for Leo and his design team.

Jimi Hendrix’s 1963 Strat Visits Seymour Duncan

It was in the year 1965 that Jimi Hendrix was starting to get work as a session player, having just left playing for Little Richard. In that year he acquired a white 1963 Stratocaster. Jimi’s rise in the UK and eventually the United States is legendary and over those years Seymour had the chance to…

The Art of Showmanship

With an ever increasing abudance of bands out there it’s more important than ever for guitarists to set themselves apart and to put on a show that will turn your audience into fans. Here we look at four methods for really wowing those who watch you.

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