A Guide to Single Coil-Sized Humbucker Guitar Pickups for Strat

Traditional Strat guitar pickups have their time and place. When you want that quintessential, glassy, bell-like chime—nothing does it like a classic Strat single coil. But sometimes we want more, more power, more output, more authority, more aggression out of our Strat. Often times, this is where traditional, vintage Strat guitar pickups don’t make the…

Tele Neck Pickup Options

The Telecaster is without question a classic instrument. It has an instantly identifiable sound – especially in the bridge and middle positions. However, the neck pickup alone is slightly weaker than the bridge position. Not to say that it doesn’t sound good, because it does. In fact Seymour Duncan makes several vintage output Tele neck pickups for those who are after that traditional, sweet Tele neck sound. I have the STR-1 Vintage Rhythm in the neck of one of my Telecasters and it’s silky smooth.

New Seymour Duncan Pickup SETS

Getting the best sound out of your guitar has just become easier. Seymour Duncan has taken the guesswork out of matching the correct pickups together and has introduced a line of matched sets that are built to work together and sound great, right out of the box. While you will still be able to obtain…

Getting A Big PAF Sound With The Little ’59

I recently completed a custom guitar build, a Charvel San-Dimas style guitar which I spec-ed out with a humbucker/single (HS) set up. I wanted a single-coil-sized humbucker for the neck, and the first pickup I’m trying in this position is the Little ’59 for Strat.

Changing the Tone of Your Wah Pedal

The wah pedal is a long-standing fixture on many pedalboards. The Cry Baby wah was the very first pedal I bought – and I still have it – but I’ve always preferred a “darker” tone in my wah sound. I find that when you “open up” the Cry Baby (toe down position), it’s too “pitchy.” Yes, I know, that’s not a word, but anyone who has run into the high-pitched squeals of an open Cry Baby wah knows exactly what I’m talking about. I could have replaced my wah pedal with something darker, but like many guitarists I didn’t want to spend $250 on another piece of gear. Correction: I wanted to spend the money on gear, but I can only hide so many guitar-related purchases a year, and adding another wah pedal seemed redundant.

Choosing Strat Pickups From A Les Paul-Players’ Perspective

What can I say? I love the Les Paul. The shape itself is sexy as hell. Curved and cut at the right places. The tone is awesome: fat and thundering, tight and singing, it’s really my go-to guitar! But sometimes music demands something else. You can’t eat steak ‘n chips every day, can you?! Sometimes your body craves for a simple, clean tomato salad. And that’s what a Strat is to me. Something to clean the palate, in order to enjoy a Les Paul more.

Tele Bridge Pickup Options

If you’ve got a Telecaster that you love the feel of but you’re not totally happy with the lead pickup sound, there are lots of options. In this article I’ll take you through some of them, and let you hear what a few of them would sound like too. I’m going to assume that your Tele is a “normal” one – as in, it has the big metal bridge plate with a single coil pickup in it. Where can we go from there?

Getting Five Sounds from Two Humbuckers

I recently built myself a Tele-style guitar from parts. I used a vintage white Swamp Ash body from Warmoth, the neck from my 10-year-old USA Fender Telecaster and hardware from… well, mostly from eBay actually. I already have a Telecaster with an STR-1 Vintage Rhythm pickup in the neck position and an APTL-3JD Jerry Donahue…

Choosing a Strat Pickguard

So you’ve got a Strat, and it’s nice, but sometimes you are just after something else from the guitar. A different tone, the ability to play completely different styles of music, or just the ability to just swap pickups with only the use of a few screw drivers. Seymour Duncan can make your life extremely easy with their collection of Liberator pickguards for Strat®.

Blues rocking guitarist Alastair Greene has the right tone for the Alan Parsons Live Project

Guitarist, singer, and songwriter Alastair Greene has been a mainstay of the Southern California music scene for over 2 decades. Alastair was born April 18th, 1971 in Santa Barbara, CA. Best known for his blues-based, soulful, and melodic guitar playing (as well as one of a rare-breed to play slide guitar), Alastair can be heard…

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