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Thread: Music theory question

  1. #61
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by budubum92 View Post
    Roger that. Ill continue with the 3 notes per string.
    IMO, dont just learn scales. Learn songs, learn licks, play to jam tracks. I like to practice my scales as sequences myself, but thats just me. Learn the fingerboard, see the octave shapes, and have fun. Its a lifetime study, enjoy it

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    Whatever notes Yngwie uses he still sounds like melodic minor to me. His note choices are essentially Bach's transferred to guitar.

    Diminished arpeggios have at least more than 3 roots as it's symmetrical, so his arpeggios are not actually outside, which explains his being stuck in a rut; Bach over and over again.
    Wrong sir, not melodic minor

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Gtrjunior View Post
    “If it sounds good, it IS good”
    And if it sounds bad, repeat it so people think you're playing jazz LOL

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by OLDERBUDWISER View Post
    And if it sounds bad, repeat it so people think you're playing jazz LOL
    Just means you don't listen to jazz or you have poor taste in it.
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    Mojo's Minions JB_From_Hell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint 55 View Post
    Just means you don't listen to jazz or you have poor taste in it.
    That's an old joke.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    It's funny and a little bit sad that in this day and age it seems like everybody has one way to do something and everything else is considered wrong.

    Under the correct circumstances, practically every technique that has been described in this thread can be useful to increase your knowledge music, melodic and harmonic diversity.

    Getting back to the OP question, I started with modes and long before I understood the theory, I had covered the fretboard and from there it was easy to see the overlap of chords, pentatonics, modes etc.

    Again, it was easier for me to see the big picture first.

    From there it was relatively easy to develop all fingerings for whatever pattern was most useful...

    Originally, I looked at convenient patterns but later realized that the same notes played in different patterns can sound/behave significantly different.

    I went as far as learning some if Alan Holdsworths theory... And as great a guitarist as he was, I realized I already had what I needed.

    So when I teach, we get the finger board covered and then we integrate the exceptions to the rules as we learn new songs.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by zionstrat View Post
    Again, it was easier for me to see the big picture first.

    From there it was relatively easy to develop all fingerings for whatever pattern was most useful...

    Originally, I looked at convenient patterns but later realized that the same notes played in different patterns can sound/behave significantly different.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    Scales and modes are so overrated.

    What's more important than memorizing and applying scales and modes is 'phrasing'. It takes years of listening and practicing to be able to spit out ideas without even thinking what scales or tonal center go with which chord, etc.

    Jazz players excel at phrasing, rock/ metal guitars not so much. That's why rock solos in general sound like scale excercise. Greg Howe is one of the very few who excel in phrasing.

    Hi i have to disagree with you. When i hear jazz players it just sounds like cockaphony up and downs. No offense but i love blues.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by zionstrat View Post
    It's funny and a little bit sad that in this day and age it seems like everybody has one way to do something and everything else is considered wrong.

    Under the correct circumstances, practically every technique that has been described in this thread can be useful to increase your knowledge music, melodic and harmonic diversity.

    Getting back to the OP question, I started with modes and long before I understood the theory, I had covered the fretboard and from there it was easy to see the overlap of chords, pentatonics, modes etc.

    Again, it was easier for me to see the big picture first.

    From there it was relatively easy to develop all fingerings for whatever pattern was most useful...

    Originally, I looked at convenient patterns but later realized that the same notes played in different patterns can sound/behave significantly different.

    I went as far as learning some if Alan Holdsworths theory... And as great a guitarist as he was, I realized I already had what I needed.

    So when I teach, we get the finger board covered and then we integrate the exceptions to the rules as we learn new songs.

    Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk

    This is exactly what i want to be doing. To know the scales and understand the fretboard. The notes the alphabets before and after.

    I know that i have potential to be a better player than just guessing what will sound good.

    Sometimes ill play something and hope i make a good mistake. I try to recreate that mistake because it sounded so good but i couldnt, so i try to carefully choose the notes just to make sense.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by OLDERBUDWISER View Post
    IMO, dont just learn scales. Learn songs, learn licks, play to jam tracks. I like to practice my scales as sequences myself, but thats just me. Learn the fingerboard, see the octave shapes, and have fun. Its a lifetime study, enjoy it

    I dont want to learn songs anymore. I dont like to do covers, im done with it. I have some original materials but im stuck with how to start the song or end it.

    I happen to make songs out from solos first then evolve into the whats the intro and the rest. So im stuck how to complete.

    Im also trying drums because i want to be better at my timing but also to support my ideas in song progressions.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by budubum92 View Post
    When i hear jazz players it just sounds like cockaphony up and downs.
    Ha

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by budubum92 View Post
    I dont want to learn songs anymore. I dont like to do covers, im done with it. I have some original materials but im stuck with how to start the song or end it.

    I happen to make songs out from solos first then evolve into the whats the intro and the rest. So im stuck how to complete.
    Always end in the root chord (I), and in ii-V-I sequence. Example: In the key of C major: Dm-G7-C.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Clint 55 View Post
    Ha

    yes that really sounds good and very calming. im talking about some jazz guitar players when i listen to them sometimes (most of the time) they dont sound to make sense.

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Ya, I don't like that either.
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    Ultimate Tone Member Francois's Avatar
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    I won't fight for musical tastes. It is a personal thing and I love many styles...

    But I would like to draw the attention to the difference between these two concepts :

    Diatonic : a scale with two half tones and five whole tones (with gives many modes like ionian, dorian, phrygian, aeolian...)

    Tempered : the fact that the intervals between the twelve half tones are calculated mathematic to be equal.

    So when you hear different interval in say asiatic music those scales may be diatonic as well (for example some indian scales like bilawal, kalyan, aswari can be considered diatonic) but the exact height of the second, third, sixth or seven degree will be different : it is not tempered.

    Some non-western music is clearly not diatonic : this is the case of the two javanese scales Slendro and Pelog for example.
    Slendro has six notes spread more or less equally across the octave.

    But sorry I went far from the OP original post and my english is getting worse today.
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by GuitarStv View Post
    I'm pretty sure that if you played a standard blues to Beethoven (well, pre-deafness anyway) or Mozart they'd both tell you that is was a pile of crap.
    Maybe yes maybe no. Those people were quite experimental in their days.

    Beethoven used the tritone as brutal punctuation in the Monlight Sonata (3rd movement) in 1802, almost two centuries before Slayer and the like.

    And Bach wrote for a new experimental instrument (the Luth Harpsicord).
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by budubum92 View Post
    I dont want to learn songs anymore. I dont like to do covers, im done with it. I have some original materials but im stuck with how to start the song or end it.

    I happen to make songs out from solos first then evolve into the whats the intro and the rest. So im stuck how to complete.

    Im also trying drums because i want to be better at my timing but also to support my ideas in song progressions.
    When I get there I usually start to think big picture of the song: What it is about? Do I have lyrics for it? What's it is it's conveying? How I want to express it?

    Makes it much easier to create beginning, fitting parts and nice ending when you know what you're actually crafting.
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    Always end in the root chord (I), and in ii-V-I sequence. Example: In the key of C major: Dm-G7-C.
    Wouldn't that take the fun out of music?

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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by nexion218 View Post
    Wouldn't that take the fun out of music?
    I was talking in terms of theory, not what is fun/ not fun.

    Either that or you can choose to be musically illiterate and play whatever the f&*% you want to play, regardless of theory. Being an idiot is a prerogative, kiddo

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    Sock Market Trader GuitarStv's Avatar
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    Default Re: Music theory question

    Quote Originally Posted by Obsessive Compulsive View Post
    I was talking in terms of theory, not what is fun/ not fun.

    Either that or you can choose to be musically illiterate and play whatever the f&*% you want to play, regardless of theory. Being an idiot is a prerogative, kiddo

    I've never run across a rule in music theory that says you have to end a progression on the I. Doing this can make a chord progression sound very complete though, which is a sound that many people like.

    Don't look at theory as a set of rules telling you what has to be done, think of it more as a way to organize music to achieve certain effect. By learning these rules, it just makes writing and playing music easier. You can more quickly find chords that work together for a particular effect for example, or you can more easily determine the best note choices over a given progression. As with blues, you can do a whole bunch of stuff that doesn't necessarily fit into standard ideas of theory and still make music that people want to listen to.
    Last edited by GuitarStv; 05-27-2019 at 06:42 AM.
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