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Thread: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

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    Default Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    I've been using the vox adio air gt for a little while now and I love it! Great cleans and rock tones!! My question is would it be woth it to also get a THR10X for high gain stuff? Does it sound considerably better in that respect? Or are the high gain sounds from the vox competitive enough to not spend another $300+ on another amp? LOW VOLUME IS A MUST, that's why I'm considering this option!

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    Ultimate Tone Member Seraphial's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    I've never had the Vox, but do own the THR10X. So all my comments are based on my experience by itself.

    The Yamaha is a VERY good amp, with some great high gain sounds. There's one particular channel I really like and default to (Brown sound), but all of them are very usable. The high gain thrash channel is much better than I anticipated (better than any old Line6 sounds anyway) but to be clear - unless you're prepared to tweak in the Yamaha software, you've basically got those sounds, and albeit for the eq and effects, if you don't like it, you're unfortunately stuck with it.

    However if you do like it, it's a lot of fun. And I have to say they sound incredibly similar to the tube tones they're trying to achieve. Not fully believable, but a close approximation.The ability to use it as a speaker, the effects, MP3 pluggable and portability wins out for me though.
    'Without music life would be a mistake'.

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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    Thanks for the reply! How does the bottom end sound on the thr10x? Can you get defined low end and some good chugging from the amp itself? I know its alot to ask of dual 3s but if it can perform admirably then it might be worth it for me, I'm moving soon and I'll have to be VERY quiet.

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    PenultimateTone Member Demanic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    Is the software difficult to edit?

    Sent from my Alcatel_5044C using Tapatalk

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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    THR10X owner here, no experience with the Vox at all.

    Having owned the THR10X for a while, I'm very happy with it, perfectly fine for practicing. Bandmate of mine even brought his one to a rehearsal, running it through the PA and even that worked very well!
    However, I have to admit that I use it pretty much exclusively for one single sound (Brown II). Not that there aren't any usable tones on those models, you can go through the presets in the software and see how creative you can get, it's just that I prefer the Brown II by a mile without much tweaking and there is nothing in its sound that puts me off, like flabby bass or boxy mids on some other amp models or fizzy-/graininess I know from different digital modelling amps. Especially on my preferred settings, it can do some nice tight chugs. Don't expect Dual-Rectifier-full-stack-levels of chugging, especially not when playing quiet, but pretty good for the size and money.

    Talking about the software: Tweaking is pretty easy and you have access to factors you can't set over the amp's knobs like cabinet simulation, effect parameters, compression, etc. Once you're happy with a setting, you can save it in the software and also in on of the amp's 5 preset banks. Just went through some presets myself and I was really surprised how much you can tweak around and the variety of sounds you can get. Still, the main theme of this amp is high gain.


    Overall, it sounds good for high gain applications and then some, but if you already own a modelling amp you're happy with, I don't see a reason to get this one.

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    Ultimate Tone Member Seraphial's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    Quote Originally Posted by JesusCrisp View Post
    THR10X owner here, no experience with the Vox at all.

    Having owned the THR10X for a while, I'm very happy with it, perfectly fine for practicing. Bandmate of mine even brought his one to a rehearsal, running it through the PA and even that worked very well!
    However, I have to admit that I use it pretty much exclusively for one single sound (Brown II). Not that there aren't any usable tones on those models, you can go through the presets in the software and see how creative you can get, it's just that I prefer the Brown II by a mile without much tweaking and there is nothing in its sound that puts me off, like flabby bass or boxy mids on some other amp models or fizzy-/graininess I know from different digital modelling amps. Especially on my preferred settings, it can do some nice tight chugs. Don't expect Dual-Rectifier-full-stack-levels of chugging, especially not when playing quiet, but pretty good for the size and money.

    Talking about the software: Tweaking is pretty easy and you have access to factors you can't set over the amp's knobs like cabinet simulation, effect parameters, compression, etc. Once you're happy with a setting, you can save it in the software and also in on of the amp's 5 preset banks. Just went through some presets myself and I was really surprised how much you can tweak around and the variety of sounds you can get. Still, the main theme of this amp is high gain.


    Overall, it sounds good for high gain applications and then some, but if you already own a modelling amp you're happy with, I don't see a reason to get this one.
    This

    Software is pretty easy, and the storable slots are good too.

    The above limitations are kinda why I'm exploring a 6505MH. Ok, it doesn't have an aux for MP3ing nor some of the effects, but if you want deep chugging in the your bedroom with headphones then something like that might be an option.

    But overall, if the objective is good tone, with limitations, at low volumes, its a great option.
    'Without music life would be a mistake'.

    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

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    Toneologist Mononoaware's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    The THR10 software is very straightforward; the effects chain is set, so there isn't a lot to tinker with beyond the individual settings. There's not much "deep diving" you can do. I consider that a strength. Tweak, save, and play, instead of forever fiddling with a thousand parameters.

    The software also gives you access to some things you can't get just from the amp face. Two compressors (the rack setting is very useful), plate and room reverbs, and cabinet emulator settings (again, very useful, as they can dramatically change the tone). Saving and loading presets is simple.

    This isn't to say the THR doesn't sound good on its own, without a PC hookup -- it really does. But the bells and whistles in the software add a lot of versatility without ramping up the complexity very much.

    Also, I've had very, very good luck running ODs, boosts, and distortions into some of the THR models, which is not something I can say about most small digital amps I've used.

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    Default Re: Vox Adio Air GT VS. Yamaha THR10X

    Yep, it takes pedals surprisingly well and even different pickups have quite noticeable effects on tone. At least compared to my old Peavey Vypyr, it seems to react to those things very real-amp-like.

    But also as mentioned, maybe getting a 6505 MH or Landy IRT Studio used could be more worth it for the same price or slightly more than a THR10X. Or if you just need a small metal amp, even something the Vox MV50 Metal or one of the high gain little Joyo Models may suffice.

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